Suzuki have released details on the specs – and pricing – for the first new Jimny in twenty years, which goes on sale in January 2019.

There will be two models made available from launch, with the SZ4 and SZ5 trims both featuring AllGrip Pro selectable 4WD with a low ratio transfer box equipped as standard.

SZ4 specifies plenty of standard equipment, such as air-con, cruise control, dual sensor brake support, DAB radio, all-important Bluetooth connectivity and front fog lamps.

The top-spec model adds 15-inch alloys and LED headlights, plus climate control, sat nav with smartphone connectivity, heated front seats, rear privacy glass and body-coloured door handles.

Lane Departure warning is standard on all models, as is the weaving alert function and high beam assist is standard, too.

With the latest slew of true off-roaders have increasingly swollen price tags – the new Wrangler is almost thrice the price of the last one, the G-Class is priced out off green lanes and into music videos and the new Defender won’t be cheap, either – has the Jimny followed suit?

No.

The SZ4 model will begin at £15,499 whilst the SZ5 is £17,999 with a manual, or £18,999 with an automatic transmission. With figures like these, and such positive reviews so far, if you want a new Jimny, you might want to get in line, now…

Although Suzuki is primarily known in hardcore off-road circles for making small but amazingly capable 4x4s like the SJ, Jimny and original Vitara, the company has long been bringing four-wheel drive to corners of the car market you barely knew existed. So now the entire car market is trying to turn itself into a parade of SUVs, the Japanese outfit should be sitting pretty.

Pretty. There’s a word. Not one we heard many people using about the recently revised SX4 S-Cross, though. Suzuki’s small SUV has been restyled to make it look more aggressive and off-roady, and you can form your own view on how that went.

Inside, it’s more conservative without being sparse the way Suzukis once could be. The cabin design is simple and effective, not very exciting but not offensive either. That’s unless you’re an adult trying to sit in the back seats, in which case the roof will offend the top of your head to kingdom come.

The panoramic sunroof is to blame here. Unfortunately, Suzuki’s range structure means this is standard fit on all 4×4 models with either the 1.4 petrol or 1.6 diesel engines; you can avoid it only by going to the entry-level 1.0-litre petrol model.

This will break the deal for some, but if you (or, more likely, your children) can cope with the dire lack of headroom in the back, legroom is among the best we’ve seen in SUVs of this size. You get a good view out, too.

That’s despite the fact that a six-foot driver will need to have his seat fully back and, probably, quite well reclined. The cabin doesn’t feel hugely roomy up front – though ironically, headroom is very good – and the seats are on the small side, though they remain comfortable over a long journey.

The seat leather does feel tough rather than supple, however. In general, material quality smacks of cost-saving, with hard plastics pretty much everywhere on the dash, though it’s stoutly assembled.

Where you don’t see any sign of cost-cutting is in the spec of the range-topping model tested here. As well as the aforementioned pan roof and leather, you get heated seats, distance-sensitive cruise, autonomous emergency braking and so on. High-spec, low-price cars can sometimes leave you feeling let down, but you don’t want for much in the driver’s seat.

One thing you do want for is a flat cargo area when the back seats go down. They do fold very simply, however, and there’s no lip to slide stuff over, so while the SX4 could be better for practicality it does still punch above its weight.

So too does the engine, which Suzuki says has an output equivalent to that of a 1.8-litre engine. It certainly doesn’t feel short of pace, with top torque coming in nice and low to help it up through the gears as the auto box does the work.

In particular, we found the vehicle impressively refined for its size. We’d driven the latest Vitara a few weeks previously and been rather disappointed by the amount of noise in the cabin at any sort of motorway pace, but the smaller SX4 is altogether quieter. It rides smoothly, too, damping out bumps with a lightness of touch that sets it very far apart from Suzukis of old. Its cabin may have similarly cheap plastics in it, but there’s nothing tinny about it.

It steers and handles well, too, with enough agility to be quite engaging when you’re on a mission. We’d choose the manual gearbox for this reason, though, to make it that much easier to wring its neck.

The auto box is very well suited to off-road use, however, at least to the modest extent to which that’s relevant. The SX4 does have decent ground clearance, and with Lock mode engaged its transmission will use the traction control system to mimic a limited-slip differential, so while ruts and deep mud are not its forte it does have green lane skills.

This all goes to making the SX4 a useful little all-rounder which, if you can see beyond its looks and aren’t put off by its terrible rear headroom, represents decent value for money in today’s new car market. It’s not a giant-killer in the mould of the vehicles that turned Suzuki into a legend among the off-road cognoscenti twenty years ago, but it’ll do everything a typical owner will ask of it – while keeping some clever tricks in reserve.

First appeared in 4×4 November 2017 issue.

Suzuki’s Vitara recently reached its 30th birthday and as such Suzuki has decided to give its current top-selling model a refresh.

Think of this as a little light cosmetic work and a few changes one might make to stay looking young as middle age approaches. Or in Suzuki’s case, a few tweaks in order to keep the Vitara appealing to new potential customers.

This is the rejuvenated 2019 model that will hit showrooms in September, and while no prices have yet to be revealed, we can fill you in on the details of what’s new.

The big news is on the engine front, with the outgoing 1.6-litre petrol being superseded by two turbocharged petrol units from Suzuki’s Boosterjet range. There’s the 1.0-litre motor producing 110bhp, which will be standard in the SZ4 and SZ-T variants of the Vitara, but Suzuki’s AllGrip four-wheel drive system is only an option for the latter when also selected with a manual ‘box.

Range-topping SZ5 models (again with AllGrip being an optional extra) utilise the 1.4-litre Boosterjet, giving the driver a healthier 140bhp and useful 162lb/ft of torque, all from as low as 1,500rpm. Emissions figures are yet to be released for the updated versions, but expect them within a matter of weeks.

The 2019 Vitara will have a makeover to accompany the heart surgery, thanks to the new alloys, revamped front grille and lower bumper, while the Vitara’s rear will boast ‘distinctive LED combination lamps’. New customers will also be treated to the addition of two new colours.

As the Vitara matures, so does its cabin, which now features an upper instrument panel softer to the touch and a revitalised central information display that now says iPhone X rather than Nokia 3210.

There’s a lot more tech as a whole and the SZ5 will be equipped with the following as standard: Dual Sensor Brake Support, Lane Departure Warning and Prevention, Traffic Sign Recognition, Blind Spot Monitor and Rear Cross Traffic Alert.

With renewed looks and a more tech-savvy package, Suzuki will be hoping their Vitara can continue to be as popular as it has been for the last 30 years.

Further information has been released on the first new Suzuki Jimny in twenty years, as the old 1.3-litre engine grows and there’s a raft of safety tech introduced.

The new Jimny will utilise a 15% lighter 1.5-litre K15B unit – which it will share with the Ertiga – a seven-seat MPV developed by Suzuki’s Indian subsidiary Maruti. The unit produces 95lbf.ft and 101bhp in a vehicle with a kerb weight of a little over a tonne.

Combine the dimensions and the peppy engine with attractive approach, brake over and departure angles – 37º, 28º and 49º respectively – and the little Suzi seems like the same classic formula.

Two transmissions will be on offer, a five-speed manual and a four-speed auto, both with a high/low transfer box and Suzuki’s AllGrip Pro 4WD system.

Suspension shapes up as a three-link rigid axle with coil springs both front and back.

As standard, the new Jimny is fitted with assisted braking – which warns of a collision and intervenes autonomously if necessary, lane departure warning, weaving alert, high-beam assist, and also reads road signs.

Whilst this information is from Suzuki, it isn’t necessarily the spec that we’ll get in the UK. This will be confirmed closer to the Jimny’s release.

After images leaked in recent weeks of the new Suzuki Jimny, we’ve been given official snaps of the ever-exciting off-road Suzi.

Details are scant at the moment, with confirmation of a ladder chassis, 3-link suspension set-up and part-time 4WD with low range ‘box.

But, what we do have is images of what the Jimny will look like – and it looks fantastic.

It’s a new look, pairing old-school charm with newfound attitude and purpose.

The interior appears well equipped and there’s a choice of single and two-tone paint options.

Nothing concrete has been released regarding specs or release for the fourth-gen, but we’ll certainly let you know as soon as there is.